Jimmie Walker did an interview for the new Showtime series, The Comedy Store, in which the comic told a tale of professional jealousy and rage. Page Six picked up on a preview of the new program in which Jimmie told the story of how Freddie Prinze wanted to kill John Travolta when he began replacing him on the cover of teen magazines in the 1970s.

Walker claims that Prinze once spoke to him on the phone and told him that they needed to murder John Travolta. Prinze reportedly said to Jimmie that he was the “biggest star on TV,” to which Jimmie responded, “well, a lot of people are on TV.”

Prinze then told him that he was the biggest star on television and that he was the “funniest guy.” Walker says he tried to talk Freddie Prinze out of killing John Travolta, but they wound up driving to his apartment anyway. Thankfully, John wasn’t home.

Despite John not being there, Freddie Prinze fired three crossbow arrows into his door anyway. Walker joked that he’s sure John Travolta wonders to himself to this day what happened to his door.

As the story goes, Prinze killed himself in 1977 when he was 22-years-old. At the time of his death, his son, Freddie Prinze Junior, was less than one-year-old. The Comedy Store will come out on the 4th of October on Showtime.

Despite Freddie Prinze’s tragic end, his son, Freddie Prinze Junior, appears to have done much better for himself. Back in 2017, Freddie touched on his romance with Sarah Michelle Gellar as well as what has kept them together for so many years.

Reportedly, Freddie and Sarah have been together for fifteen years. Freddie and Sarah first met while filming the hit horror film, I Know What You Did Last Summer, which has gone down in history as a cult classic.

They were just friends when they first started working together, but over time, they slowly became closer and closer. Junior admits that he and Sarah probably mesh well because they were close friends for two years before.

Due to knowing each other for two years prior, they were already aware of each other’s idiosyncracies, the good and the bad.